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Hashtag Gesundheit e. V. – Climate protection = health protection?!

Climate protection = health protection?!

November 14, 2021

No comments

Climate change is a huge challenge, perhaps the biggest of our time. This has been proven by many studies and should not be disputed. In Germany, global climate change has been making itself felt for several years, with both hotter summers and milder winters.

Humans have caused climate change and are thus responsible for the warming of the atmosphere, the oceans and the land areas. This climatic trend is already causing many climate and weather extremes, such as heat waves, heavy precipitation, droughts, and tropical cyclones across the globe. This phenomenon is expected to intensify in the future.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) makes the following statement:

Many changes in the climate system will become larger in direct relation to increasing global warming. These include increases in the frequency and intensity of heat extremes, marine heat waves and heavy precipitation, agricultural and environmental droughts in some regions, the proportion of violent tropical cyclones, and declines in Arctic sea ice, snow cover, and permafrost. 1

Et is projected that in the future, large portions of the planet will likely be uninhabitable by humans-while the population grows. 1

But what does this have to do with our health?

Direct and indirect effects on our health

Even though in the general public the link between climate change and health is little discussed, some studies show that climate change poses a real threat to our health.

There are both direct and indirect impacts on health. Direct impacts are immediate changes in regional living conditions. These include, for example:

  • Increased heat waves
  • More frequent and/or unusually severe storms, precipitation, or flooding
  • Increased UV radiation

But how do these immediate changes in living conditions affect health?

Excessive heat can lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. This means symptoms such as exhaustion, fever, diarrhea and vomiting may occur.

UV radiation affects the skin and eyes. Increased UV radiation can cause increased eye inflammation and sunburn. In the long term, increased UV radiation can even lead to cancer.

Indirect effects of climate change on health include, for example.: 1

  • Prolongation of the pollen season and altered allergen spectrum, resulting in increased allergies over a longer period of time.
  • Exposure of the respiratory tract to higher levels of air pollutants, such as ozone and particulate matter
  • Lack of food and drinking water hygiene as well as their scarcity can lead to a spread of pathogens up to epidemics as well as malnutrition
  • Poorer bathing water quality also increases the risk of epidemics.
  • Changing environmental conditions, such as flooding due to sea level rise, can promote the spread of animal intermediate hosts and disease vectors and increase the risk of (novel) infectious diseases
  • Socioeconomic dislocation, social conflict, and migration processes can destabilize already existing health systems

These impacts are already being felt today, just look at the string of record heat years and the rise in global mean temperature. (see figure)

<span style=”font-weight: 400″>Figure: Rise in global mean temperature © NASA, GISS 2

Climate change as an amplifier of existing health risks

Many studies show that climate change additionally acts as an amplifier of already existing and unequally distributed health risks such as poverty, hunger, malnutrition but also lack of education, flight and displacement.

It can be assumed that as global warming progresses, the performance of the health system will be put to the test. The human organism has a limited capacity to adapt and is therefore unable to fully cope with all impacts.

Co-benefits

It is also exciting to note that many climate change measures can have a positive impact on health. Decarbonizing the energy, industrial, and transportation sectors leads to cleaner air. In addition, changing mobility behavior (for example, cycling instead of driving) leads to a more active and healthier lifestyle. And climate-compatible nutrition and agriculture also have many health benefits. Ecological and regional food production with less animal husbandry and more fruits and vegetables prevents cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases as well as diabetes mellitus. 3

Many of our lifestyles (consumption and production patterns) are the cause of man-made climate change and at the same time contribute to a variety of chronic diseases. Consistent climate protection is therefore preventive health protection. 3 – Dieter Lehmkuhl, physician for psychiatry, neurology and psychotherapy

At the 2015 UN Climate Summit in Paris, an agreement was reached to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius, if possible even to 1.5 degrees Celsius, in order to contain the consequences of climate change. If the 1.5 degree target is to be achieved, climate protection efforts must be stepped up worldwide. 2

If we want to protect our health, we must protect the climate!

You can find out how healthcare can contribute to this in the next blog article, which will be published shortly.

Just reading is not enough for you? Then join us on November 19 at 6:00 p.m. at Live stream of #health on climate change & health protection. Join us!

<strong>Source Notes (last accessed 10/25/2021):

1 Cf. RKI (2010): Klimawandel und Gesundheit, Ein Sachstandsbericht.

2 DKK (2020): What we know about climate today – Basic facts about climate change that are undisputed in science. Ed.: German Climate Consortium, German Meteorological Society, German Weather Service, Extreme Weather Congress Hamburg, Helmholtz Climate Initiative, September 2020, https://www.deutsches-klima-konsortium.de/fileadmin/user_upload/pdfs/Publikationen_DKK/basisfakten-klimawandel.pdf

3 Lehmkuhl, Dieter (2019): The issue of climate change and its importance in the health sector: development, actors, milestones.

Müller, Olaf/ Jahn, Albrecht/ Gabrysch, Sabine (2018): Planetary Health: a comprehensive health concept, link: https://www.aerzteblatt.de/archiv/201358/Planetary-Health-Ein-umfassendes-Gesundheitskonzept

Did you like the article? Then feel free to share it on your social networks:

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LinkedIn

Moana Hösch

Moana Hösch has been a member of Hashtag Health since May 2021. Her interest in healthcare was sparked during a volunteer service in a South American nursing home. Currently, Moana is studying health economics at Ravensburg-Weingarten University of Applied Sciences and is mainly interested in digital opportunities to improve healthcare and the healthcare system as a whole. In addition to digitalization, she is particularly involved in the area of sustainability in and outside of the healthcare sector.esens.

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It’s a match: #Health meets Purpose:Health
Next Post
Sustainability in the hospital sector

The post Climate protection = health protection?! appeared first on Hashtag Gesundheit e. V..

Source

Climate protection = health protection?!

November 14, 2021

No comments

Climate change is a huge challenge, perhaps even the biggest of our time. This has been proven by many studies and should not be disputed. In Germany, global climate change has been making itself felt for several years, with hotter summers and milder winters.

Humans have caused climate change and are thus responsible for the warming of the atmosphere, the oceans and the land areas. This climatic trend is already causing many climate and weather extremes, such as heat waves, heavy precipitation, droughts, and tropical cyclones across the globe. This phenomenon is expected to intensify in the future.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) makes the following statement:

Many changes in the climate system will be directly related to the increasingehmenden global warming greater. These include increases in the frequency and intensity of heat extremes, marine heat waves and heavy precipitation, agricultural and environmental droughts in some regions, the proportion of violent tropical cyclones, and declines in Arctic sea ice, snow cover, and permafrost. 1

Et is projected that in the future, large portions of the planet will likely be uninhabitable by humans-while the population grows. 1

But what does this have to do with our health?

Direct and indirect effects on our health

Although there is little discussion among the general public about the link between climate change and health, some studies show that climate change poses a real threat to our health.

There are both direct and indirect impacts on health. Direct impacts are immediate changes in regional living conditions. These include, for example:

  • Increased heat waves
  • More frequent and/or unusually severe storms, precipitation, or flooding
  • Increased UV radiation

But how do these immediate changes in living conditions affect health?

Excessive heat can lead to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. This means symptoms such as exhaustion, fever, diarrhea and vomiting may occur.

UV radiation affects the skin and eyes. Increased UV radiation can cause increased eye inflammation and sunburn. In the long term, increased UV radiation can even lead to cancer.

Indirect effects of climate change on health include, for example.: 1

  • Prolongation of the pollen season and altered allergen spectrum, resulting in increased allergies over a longer period of time.
  • Exposure of the respiratory tract to higher levels of air pollutants, such as ozone and particulate matter
  • Lack of food and drinking water hygiene as well as their scarcity can lead to a spread of pathogens up to epidemics as well as malnutrition
  • A schDecreased bathing water quality also increases the risk of epidemics.
  • Changing environmental conditions, such as flooding due to sea level rise, can promote the spread of animal intermediate hosts and disease vectors and increase the risk of (novel) infectious diseases
  • Socioeconomic dislocation, social conflict, and migration processes can destabilize already existing health systems

These impacts are already being felt today, just look at the string of record heat years and the rise in global mean temperature. (see figure)

Figure: Rise in global mean temperature © NASA, GISS 2

Climate change as an amplifier of existing health risks

Many studies show that climate change additionally acts as an amplifier of already existing and unequally distributed health risks such as poverty, hunger, malnutrition but also lack of education, flight and displacement.

It can be assumed that as global warming progresses, the performance of the health system will be put to the test. The human organism has a limited capacity to adapt and is therefore unable to fully cope with all impacts.

Co-benefits

It is also exciting to note that many climate change measures can have a positive impact on health. Decarbonizing the energy, industrial, and transportation sectors leads to cleaner air. In addition, changing mobility behavior (for example, cycling instead of driving) leads to a more active and healthier lifestyle. And climate-compatible nutrition and agriculture also have many health benefits. Ecological and regional food production with less animal husbandry and more fruits and vegetables prevents cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases as well as diabetes mellitus. 3

Many of our lifestyles (consumption and production patterns) are the cause of man-made climate change and at the same time contribute to a variety of chronic diseases. Consistent climate protection is therefore preventive health protection. 3 – Dieter Lehmkuhl, physician for psychiatry, neurology and psychotherapy

At the 2015 UN Climate Summit in Paris</strong>, the agreement was reached to limit global warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius, if possible even to 1.5 degrees Celsius, in order to contain the consequences of climate change. If the 1.5 degree target is to be achieved, climate protection efforts must be stepped up worldwide. 2

If we want to protect our health, we must protect the climate!

You can find out how healthcare can contribute to this in the next blog article, which will be published shortly.

Just reading is not enough for you? Then join us on November 19 at 6:00 p.m. at Live stream of #health on climate change & health protection. Join us!

Source Notes (last accessed 10/25/2021):

1 Cf. RKI (2010): Climate change and health, A status report.

2 DKK (2020): What we know about climate today – Basic facts about climate change that are undisputed in science. Ed.: German Climate Consortium, German Meteorological Society, German Weather Service, Extreme Weather Congress Hamburg, Helmholtz Climate Initiative, September 2020, https://www.deutsches-klima-konsortium.de/fileadmin/user_upload/pdfs/Publikationen_DKK/basisfakten-klimawandel.pdf

3 Lehmkuhl, Dieter (2019): The issue of climate change and its importance in the health sector: development, actors, milestones.

Müller, Olaf/ Jahn, Albrecht/ Gabrysch, Sabine (2018): Planetary Health: a comprehensive health concept, Link: https://www.aerzteblatt.de/archiv/201358/Planetary-Health-Ein-umfassendes-Gesundheitskonzept

Did you like the article? Then feel free to share it on your social networks:

Instagram

LinkedIn
<div class=”g-cols vc_row via_flex valign_middle type_default”>

Moana Hösch

Moana Hösch has been a member of Hashtag Health since May 2021. Her interest in healthcare was sparked during a volunteer service in a South American nursing home. Currently, Moana is studying health economics at Ravensburg-Weingarten University of Applied Sciences and is mainly interested in digital opportunities to improve healthcare and the healthcare system as a whole. In addition to digitalization, she is particularly involved in the area of sustainability in and also outside of healthcare.

Previous post
It’s a match: #health meets Purpose:Health
Next post
Sustainability in the hospital sector

The post Climate protection = health protection?! appeared first on Hashtag Gesundheit e. V..


Continue reading: https://hashtag-gesundheit.de/oekonomie_politik/klimawandel_teil-1/

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