Od jutra mega promocja na męskie artykuły do wypoczynku kupisz również na lulany.pl - męskie artykuły do wypoczynku promocja - https://lulanu.pl/find/meskie+artykuly+do+wypoczynku+promocja
https://aurii.pl/ fartuch kuchenny Fartuchy medyczne w niskiej cenie Fartuch kuchenny dostępny w różnych rozmiarach. Tania i szybka dostawa.
peruki kraków sklep peruka-sklep.pl Szukasz idealnej peruki dla siebie? Peruki naturalne jak i syntetyczne, w różnych kolorach i fakturach znajdziesz u nas! Sklep z perukami w Krakowie zaprasza!     
zabawki inteligentne dla kota   kamień wulkaniczny do twarzymontaż projektorów w lampach samochodowych   króliki reksyczęści do e-papierosa volish   etykieciarka ręczna   klawiatura do ipada mini   serce rysunek   nike hypervenom phade ii   lovesense max 2   https://shopopolis.org/pl/page/16/   WAPRO ERP

Connected Healthcare: Between Health Mania & Prevention

website maker

Connected Healthcare: Between health mania & prevention

What role does the smart assistant on the wrist play?

In her novel about the future, “Corpus Delicti,” published in 2009, Juli Zeh already describes a health dictatorship in which all people’s activities are recorded and monitored by the state. Sleep and nutrition reports, tracking of the daily sports program and regular health checks using electronic sensors are mandatory for everyone in this world. Behavior that is harmful to health, such as smoking, is punished. In this novel, the state’s primary goal is to enable people to lead healthy lives – at least in purely physical terms.

All just science fiction?

In recent years, there has been a trend toward “quantified self.” The urge to collect more and more “body data” and optimize it seems endless. It is therefore not surprising that wearables are more popular than ever and experienced a boom in 2021.1 The selection of fitness and health trackers is huge and hardly manageable. So it’s normal for us today to have smartwatches accompanying our everyday lives. Smart watches can already record a wide range of data. For example, step count, calorie consumption, heart rate, sleep phases, stress level, oxygen content, skin temperature or blood pressure – to name just a few.

Starting with the Apple Watch Series 4 model, ECGs can now be recorded with the smartwatch.2 The Fitbit ECG app on the Fitbit Sense and Charge 5 models also has this function.3 The smart assistants detect irregularities in the heart rhythm that may indicate atrial fibrillation and then display a warning message. If data is recorded that indicates a serious condition, users are asked to call an emergency service immediately. In addition, the recorded ECG curves can be transmitted to doctors as a PDF.

The use of smart sensors in everyday life can help us to detect hidden body signals not only in a clinical environment but also at home and on the move. This is exactly where Connected Healthcare comes in – healthcare is to be organized more flexibly and autonomously. This is intended to provide medical care outside of doctors’ offices, hospitals and other previous structures.

Figure: Smartwatches and fitness trackers as smart assistants4

Connected healthcare: benefits and risks

The benefits of such technologies are obvious. They are designed to facilitate the collection of health information and its exchange, thus contributing to the early detection of diseases. In addition, they can also be used in diagnostics and therapy. But do these smart sensors actually contribute to a healthier lifestyle? Do we actually sleep more relaxed with a watch on our wrist? Do we move more when we have our steps counted?

The various measured values will become even more interesting for us in the future if we succeed in combining different data classes (movement, location and medical data) and recognizing patterns in them. Connected Healthcare can therefore help us to make thending connections in individual behavior and health and making them visible to us. For example, are the cardiac arrhythmias due to daily visits to the fast food restaurant? Or is it perhaps due to stressful days at work in recent weeks? As a result, wearables will take on the role of digital coach and everyday assistant even more in the future.

Nevertheless, we should not rely exclusively on these little helpers. (As yet) not everything that contributes to our well-being and health can be recorded with sensor technology. Despite all the technical possibilities, we must not forget to pay attention to our body’s signals. We shouldn’t worry about our health only when our smartwatch sounds the alarm. Aaron Antonovsky’s health-disease continuum shows that health is complex and, above all, individual. In this context, the human being does not only consist of measurable parameters. Well-being does not only include physical aspects, mental and social well-being is also essential. Even if all parameters are within the normal range and we are apparently (physically) healthy, it does not mean that we also feel healthy. In the future, we should therefore also ask ourselves how the constant recording of health data and the monitoring of our own health affects our psyche. Aren’t we perhaps also becoming increasingly stressed as a result, because we are gripped by health mania? There are always parameters that could look even better and for which we get tips from our gadgets?5

Figure: Health-disease continuum and dimensions of health according to Antonovsky6

Connected Healthcare as an enabler for health promotion and prevention?!

Smaller and more inconspicuous sensors and advanced algorithms still offer a lot of potential – especially with regard to (individual) health promotion and prevention. Studies are already investigating the use of smartwatches as a method of long-term monitoring for predicting atrial fibrillation, sleep apnea and COPD.7 Whether we should generally make our daily recorded health data available to research by donating data is increasingly being discussed. By recording health-related parameters, we would thus not only keep an eye on our own health. In the future, our data could contribute to earlier detection of diseases through better diagnostics and improved treatment. Smartwatches and the like would then offer benefits not only for the individual but also for others.

However, in addition to the further development of technical aspects and the discussion about data donation, we should not lose sight of promoting the health literacy of the population. Data and results should not only be collected. It must also be possible to present and interpret them transparently in order to draw the appropriate health-promoting conclusions.

At the same time, we should not forget to listen to ourselves and be attentive to the signals our bodies are sending us. How often do we actually still ask ourselves the question “How am I doing?” or “How do I feel today?”.

Our idea for this blog post came up during the OpenHPI course “Connected Healthcare: Capturing and Analyzing Health Data in Everyday Life” at the Hasso Plattner Institute.8 In doing so, our blog post only addresses a few aspects of the discussion about the benefits and potential uses of wearables. We have not (yet) addressed here how the increasing self-optimization could affect our interaction with one another or how we as a society should deal responsibly with the collected health data.

Of course, we are also interested in what other opportunities and risks you associate with wearables and connected healthcare. Feel free to use the comments function or write your own blog post on the topic.

Sources (last accessed 03.01.2022):

1 Deloitte (2021): Mobile & Digital Consumer Trends Survey 2021. Selected results for the German market, retrieved from https://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloitte/de/Documents/technology-media-telecommunications/Mobile_Digital_Consumer_Trends_Survey_2021_Deloitte.pdf

2 https://www.apple.com/de/healthcare/apple-watch/

3 https://www.fitbit.com/global/de/technology/ecg

4 Photo by Luke Chesser on Unsplash.

5 van Dijk, E., Westerink, J. & Ijsselsteijn, W. (2014): Self-tracking of stress: what are the effects?, Conference Paper.

6 Aaron Antonovsky (1979) & WHO (1948): Health-disease continuum and dimensions of health.

7 Ledwoch, J. & Duncker, D. (2020): eHealth – Smart devices revolutionize cardiology. Herzschr Elektrophys, 31(4), pp. 368-3746.

8 https://open.hpi.de/courses/connectedhealthcare2021

Did you like the article? Then feel free to share it on your social networks:

Anna Knobloch

Anna Knobloch comes from the easternmost city in Germany and studies “Management in Healthcare” at the University of Applied Sciences Zittau/Görlitz. She has been a member of Hashtag Gesundheit since March 2020. In October 2021, she participated in the OpenHPI course on Connected Healthcare. Privately, she uses a fitness tracker herself.

Daniel Moll works in the field of health promotion and prevention. As a sports scientist, he regularly tracks his activities and health data in everyday life and during sports. He has been active with Hashtag Health since mid-2020 and on the board since October 2021.

Daniel Moll

Source

website maker

Connected Healthcare: Between Health Mania & Prevention

What role does the smart assistant on your wrist play?

In her novel about the future, “Corpus Delicti,” published in 2009, Juli Zeh already describes a health dictatorship in which all of people’s activities are recorded and monitored by the state. Sleep and nutrition reports, tracking of the daily sports program and regular health checks using electronic sensors are mandatory for everyone in this world. Behavior that is harmful to health, such as smoking, is punished. In this novel, the state’s primary goal is to enable people to lead healthy lives – at least in purely physical terms.

All just science fiction?

In recent years, there has been a trend toward “quantified self.” The DThe desire to collect and optimize more and more “body data” seems endless. It is therefore not surprising that wearables are more popular than ever and experienced a boom in 2021.1 The selection of fitness and health trackers is huge and hardly manageable. So it’s normal for us today to have smartwatches accompanying our everyday lives. The smart watches can already record a wide range of data. For example, step count, calorie consumption, heart rate, sleep phases, stress level, oxygen content, skin temperature or blood pressure – to name just a few.

Starting with the Apple Watch Series 4 model, ECGs can now be recorded with the smartwatch.2 The Fitbit ECG app on the Fitbit Sense and Charge 5 models also has this function.3 The smart assistants detect irregularities in the heart rhythm that may indicate atrial fibrillation and then display a warning message. If data is recorded that indicates a serious condition, users are asked to call an emergency service immediately. In addition, the recorded ECG curves can be transmitted to doctors as a PDF.

The use of smart sensors in everyday life can help us to detect hidden body signals not only in a clinical environment but also at home and on the move. This is exactly where Connected Healthcare comes in – healthcare is to be organized more flexibly and autonomously. This is intended to provide medical care outside of doctors’ offices, hospitals and other previous structures.

Figure: Smartwatches and fitness trackers as smart assistants4

Connected healthcare: benefits and risks

The benefits of such technologies are obvious. They are designed to facilitate the collection of health information and its exchange, thus contributing to the early detection of diseases. In addition, they can also be used in diagnostics and therapy. But do these smart sensors actually contribute to a healthier lifestyle? Do we actually sleep more relaxed with a watch on our wrist? Do we move more when we have our steps counted?

The various measured values will become even more interesting for us in the future if we succeed in combining different data classes (movement, location and medical data) and recognizing patterns in them. Connected healthcare can therefore help to uncover correlations in individual behavior and health and make them visible to us. For example, are cardiac arrhythmias due to daily visits to the fast food restaurant? Or is it perhaps due to stressful days at work in recent weeks? As a result, wearables will take on the role of digital coach and everyday assistant even more in the future.

Nevertheless, we should not rely exclusively on these little helpers. (As yet) not everything that contributes to our well-being and health can be recorded with sensor technology. Despite all the technical possibilities, we must not forget to pay attention to our body’s signals. We shouldn’t worry about our health only when our smartwatch sounds the alarm. Aaron Antonovsky’s health-disease continuum shows that healthyis complex and, above all, individual. The human being does not only consist of measurable parameters. Well-being includes not only physical aspects; mental and social well-being are also essential. Even if all parameters are within the normal range and we are apparently (physically) healthy, it does not mean that we also feel healthy. In the future, we should therefore also ask ourselves how the constant recording of health data and the monitoring of our own health affects our psyche. Aren’t we perhaps also becoming increasingly stressed as a result, because we are gripped by health mania? There are always parameters that could look even better and for which we get tips from our gadgets?5

Figure: Health-disease continuum and dimensions of health according to Antonovsky6

Connected Healthcare as an enabler for health promotion and prevention?!

Smaller and more inconspicuous sensors and advanced algorithms still offer a lot of potential – especially with regard to (individual) health promotion and prevention. Studies are already investigating the use of smartwatches as a method of long-term monitoring for predicting atrial fibrillation, sleep apnea and COPD.7 Whether we should generally make our daily recorded health data available to research by donating data is increasingly being discussed. By recording health-related parameters, we would thus not only keep an eye on our own health. In the future, our data could contribute to earlier detection of diseases through better diagnostics and improved treatment. Smartwatches and the like would then offer benefits not only for the individual but also for others.

However, in addition to the further development of technical aspects and the discussion about data donation, we should not lose sight of promoting the health literacy of the population. Data and results should not only be collected. It must also be possible to present and interpret them transparently in order to draw the appropriate health-promoting conclusions.

At the same time, we should not forget to listen to ourselves and be attentive to the signals our bodies are sending us. How often do we actually still ask ourselves the question “How am I doing?” or “How do I feel today?”.

Our idea for this blog post came about during the OpenHPI course “Connected Healthcare: Capturing and Analyzing Health Data in Everyday Life” at the Hasso Plattner Institute.8 In doing so, our blog post picks up on just a few aspects of the discussion surrounding the benefits and potential uses of wearables. We have not (yet) addressed here how the increasing self-optimization could affect our interaction with one another or how we as a society should deal responsibly with the collected health data.

Of course, we are also interested in what other opportunities and risks you associate with wearables and connected healthcare. Feel free to use the comment function or write your own blog post on the topic.

Sources (last accessed 03.01.2022):

1 Deloitte (2021): Mobile & Digital Consumer Trends Survey 2021. Selected results for the German market, retrieved. At

https://www2.deloitte.com/content/dam/Deloit

te/de/Documents/technology-media-telecommunications/Mobile_Digital_Consumer_Trends_Survey_2021_Deloitte.pdf

2 https://www.apple.com/de/healthcare/apple-watch/

3 https://www.fitbit.com/global/de/technology/ecg

4 Photo by Luke Chesser on Unsplash

5 van Dijk, E., Westerink, J. & Ijsselsteijn, W. (2014): Self-tracking of stress: what are the effects?, Conference Paper

6 Aaron Antonovsky (1979) & WHO (1948): health-disease continuum and dimensions of health

7 Ledwoch, J. & Duncker, D. (2020): eHealth – Smart devices revolutionize cardiology. Herzschr Elektrophys

, 31(4), pp. 368-3746

8 https://open.hpi.de/courses/connectedhealthcare2021

Did you like the article? Then feel free to share it on your social networks

:

Anna Knobloch

Anna Knobloch comes from the easternmost city in Germany and studies “Management in Healthcare” at the University of Applied Sciences Zittau/Görlitz. She has been a member of Hashtag Gesundheit since March 2020. In October 2021, she participated in the OpenHPI course on Connected Healthcare. Privately, she uses a fitness tracker herself.

Daniel Moll works in the field of health promotion and prevention. As a sports scientist, he regularly tracks his activities and health data in everyday life and during sports. He has been active with Hashtag Health since mid-2020 and on the board since October 2021.

Daniel Moll


Continue reading: https://hashtag-gesundheit.de/digitalisierung/connected-healthcare/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Related Post

What can I do with a tensor, a one-handed rod ? | Indolife

What is a tensor ? A fine measuring instrument, a radiaesthetic instrument. It always consists of a handle, a rod, a tip. Besides the rod, especially the tip made of

BGM Part 2 – Health as a private matter or corporate factor?

BGM Part 2 – Health as a private matter or company factor? June 4, 2021 Katja Stenzel No comments Source Post Image: The first part of the BGM blog series

Corona vaccination requirement for all unlikely, compromise proposal on…

/Ralf, stock.adobe.com Berlin — In Germany, there will probably be no general corona vaccination from 18 years. The supporters of a corresponding bill announced today in Berlin at short notice